Posts tagged Small Dishes
Tofu + Soba Noodle Salad

In the summer, I live off cooling veg + pasta salads. This one is a Tofu + Soba Noodle Salad. It's got all the goods and is perfectly satisfying for the remaining weeks of summer. If you haven’t cooked with soba noodles before, give em a try. They taste more earthy than typical pasta and are a nice way to mix up your typical routine. Plus, soba noodles cook in only 3 minutes! Keep them on hand for nights when you only have a total of 10 minutes to get pasta, leftover veg, and cheese or protein into a bowl for dinner.

Read More
Herb-Roasted Eggplant and Tomatoes

Herb-Roasting is a great way to enjoy vegetables. Chopped, raw veggies don’t often have a lot of flavor and can be difficult to digest. In Ayurveda, well-cooked food - especially vegetables - resonate best with your digestive system. Try applying this recipe to your favorite veggies. I like eggplant and tomatoes, but the herbs and roasting process can be applied to squashes, peppers, cauliflower, onion, carrot, etc.

Read More
Beetroot Hummus

Hummus! It’s an appetizer spread staple great with crudité, crackers, breads, roasted veggies, etc. To spice up my typical hummus recipe, I add beets, which provide brilliant color, earthy taste, and additional nutrients. It’s easy to pick up ready-made hummus just about anywhere these days, but try making it at home. You’ll be impressed with the upgrade in taste and it makes an excellent dish to share with friends.

Read More
Egyptian Dukkah

Think of Dukkah as your savory topping for just about everything. Dukkah is a wonderful way to enhance the flavor of your food without leaning on sugars/sweeteners, oils, or salt. I put Dukkah on salads, roasted vegetables, cooked meats, eggs, toasts, avocados, and even on fruits like peaches, or mangos. There are many, many versions of Dukkah (in Egypt and across the Mediterranean and Middle East), so experiment with what you like. You can leave behind spices you don’t like, or leverage what you have in the pantry. Here’s my version.

Read More
Chapati

Chapatis are made with two ingredients. Two! While bread has been demonized in recent years as an ‘unnecessary extra,’ chapatis, in my opinion, hold an important role in a meal. They round out the main dishes and flavors, allow for better digestion (for me, anyway), and are made fresh. Eating a bread that is cooked fresh allows you to bypass many of the issues with modern bread options in the United States. No packaged, preserved, sugary, and can-stay-on-your-counter-for-a-week stuff here. Plus, with a drizzle of ghee, the taste rivals anything you can get at the store.

Read More